Lost Dallas.

This past Saturday morning, I went on a walking tour of “Lost Dallas” conducted by the Dallas Center for Architecture (DCFA). Mark Doty is the author of “Lost Dallas”, a volume in the Images of America series. He and Greg Brown from the DCFA guided a group of a dozen or so on a two-hour stroll, regaling us with stories of historic buildings, lost and saved. The morning was cool and gray, perfect weather and perfect subject for black-and-white photos. Here are a few images of the tour.

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Statler Hotel, opened 1956, currently undergoing renovation. This was Dallas’s first major venue for conventions.

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Municipal Building, opened October 17, 1914. Style: Beaux-Arts. Currently closed and inaccessible to the public due to extensive renovations. After his arrest, Lee Harvey Oswald was placed in a cell in this building, and it was in the basement of this same building where Jack Ruby shot Oswald as the prisoner was preparing to be transferred to another facility. Oswald’s cell in the Municipal Building will be preserved.

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Wilson Building, completed 1904.

Another view of the Majestic Theatre giving ta better view of its context.

The Majestic Theatre is a striking contrast to skyscraper Dallas. The theatre, which opened April 11, 1921, is the last remaining building on Dallas’s Theatre Row. The skyscraper to the left of the theatre is the 1700 Pacific building, completed in 1983, standing 655 feet high.

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You’d never know it, if you weren’t told it… The carved medallion above the door of the old Titches Building in Dallas represents Vice-President George M. Dallas. One explanation (there are several) for the city’s name is that it was an homage to this man. The Titches building opened in 1929.

Speaking of Titches, the store used to occupy what is now Hotel Indigo. Originally built in 1925 by Conrad Hilton.

Speaking of Titches, the store used to occupy the site of what is now Hotel Indigo. The Dallas Opera House also occupied this site. The present structure was built in 1925 by Conrad Hilton.

The Adolphus Hotel opened on October 5, 1912, and is still an upscale Dallas hotel landmark. Style: Beaux-Arts.

The Adolphus Hotel opened on October 5, 1912, and is still an upscale Dallas hotel landmark. Style: Beaux-Arts.

Please let us know what you think about what we see.